Physical therapy, exercises and ergonomics for complaints of occupational pain in the arm, neck or shoulder

Physical therapy, exercises and ergonomics for complaints of occupational pain in the arm, neck or shoulder -

Physical therapy, exercises and ergonomics for complaints of occupational pain in the arm, neck or shoulder

Background

The complaints relating to work-pain in the arm, neck or shoulder are also known as repetitive strain injury or occupational overuse syndrome. This is a burden for individual workers, their employers and the large-scale company, as this impacts the social functioning both in everyday life and work.

Studies included in the review

We included randomized controlled studies of all potential treatments, such as exercise, ergonomic adjustments in the workplace, massage and manual therapy. These treatments are designed to reduce pain and improve function, they can also be provided by general practitioners or physiotherapists. We excluded injections and surgical procedures that have invaded the body and requiring more specific skills. We included studies only when the authors showed that people surveyed complained of pain related to work. We conducted searches of electronic databases until May 2013.

Results

We found 44 studies involving 6580 people. Twenty-one studies evaluated exercises, 13 evaluated ergonomic adjustments in the workplace and assessed behavioral interventions 9. We combined the results of these studies by category. Eight other studies evaluated various other treatments.

We could not find any consistent effect in any treatment of pain, recovery, disability or sick leave. In several studies, the ergonomic interventions reduced long-term pain, but not in the short term. We found that nine studies were of high quality, but the results were very inconsistent. We have found no cause of variation in study results. Better education, with greater scale, a diagnosis of occupational accurate and comply with the notification guidelines are needed.

Authors' conclusions:

We found evidence of very low quality indicating that pain, recovery, disability and sick leave are similar after exercise compared to no treatment, minor surgery or exercises provided treatment additional in people suffering from work-related pain in the arm, neck or shoulder. low quality evidence also showed that ergonomic interventions did not reduce pain at short-term follow-up, but reduced during long-term follow-up. There was no evidence of effect on other endpoints. For behavioral and other interventions, there was no evidence of a consistent effect on any of the outcome measures.

Studies, including more participants with a more accurate diagnosis of occupational origin and comply with the notification guidelines are needed.

Physical therapy, exercises and ergonomics for complaints of occupational pain in the arm, neck or shoulder